10 Benefits to Reading Board Books With Babies and Young Children

Frolic-scene_1080x608

Introducing Board Especially Books Designed For Children Ages 0-3

The all new Frolic board books, released earlier this week, are based on early child developmental science for kids ages 0-3. From color choice to language and aesthetic, we’ve designed the books to appeal to your youngest family members. In addition, every book includes special content designed to help parents appropriately engage little ones. You can check out some sample pages below or explore more here.

parentconnectiongodmadeusall Try This God Finds Us

Below, you can find learning insights from 10 parenting sources and experts that detail the benefit of reading age-appropriate books with small children.

1.

“Reading a book to your newborn is a one-on-one activity that you can really turn into a special time with your baby,” says Mary Ann Abrams, MD, Reach Out and Read’s Medical Director (reachoutandread.org). “It exposes the baby to the sound of your voice, which is soothing for him.” In fact, a recent study in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics found that reading to babies in the NICU can help parents develop the same feelings of intimacy that parents of healthy newborns cultivate in the days and weeks after a baby’s birth.

2.

Hearing words helps to build a rich network of words in a baby’s brain. Kids whose parents frequently talk/read to them know more words by age 2 than children who have not been read to. And kids who are read to during their early years are more likely to learn to read at the right time. Kids Health

3.

At three months of age, your baby shows excitement when a toy or book is placed in front of her. Now she can move her eye muscles to examine things of interest, identify most adult colors and is generally interested in looking at a toy or book. Language enhancing toys for this age have lots to talk about as you describe the toy, read the book or talk about the illustrations. Therefore chose toys that have contrasts in color and pattern, texture, and sound as well as flexibility in movement so you have opportunities to describe using varied and rich vocabulary. – Play on Words

4.

As babies team to sit up, crawl, stand and then walk, the possibilities quickly expand They’re ready to experiment with nesting cups, activity boxes, stacking rings, large blocks, and a little later with shape-sorters. These toys help develop fine motor skills and reach relationships among objects. Cloth or board books, especially intriguing with pictures of faces or familiar objects, let then, practice object-recognition and instill basic ideas of language. – Child Development Institute

5.

By the time she is 4 months old, your baby will show an interest in books and start to explore them by chewing or throwing them. At this age, your baby needs sturdy vinyl or cloth books that can survive chewing and are not easily torn. During [the 6 to 12 months stage], babies become less interested in mouthing books and more interested in the story. You can promote your baby’s interest in books by looking at books with him and talking about the pictures, especially those that interest your baby. Invite your 8- or 9-month-old baby to turn the pages.  – PBS

.6

Unlike solid foods, it is never too early to start reading with your baby. Who cares if it’s the sports page or Elmo—it will be the time you share together that counts, so have fun with it! Whatever babies are interested in at {the 6 to 12 month] age, they predictably put straight in their mouths. Books are no exception. Now that your baby can sit in your lap; grab for a book; and show his or her interest by batting at, turning, or gumming the pages, you’ll find yourself especially appreciative of board books for their drool-proof nature. – Healthy Children

7.

Believe it or not, by the time babies reach their first birthday they will have learned all the sounds needed to speak their native language. The more stories you read aloud, the more words your child will be exposed to and the better he or she will be able to talk. – Kids Health

8.

The [report by the American Academy of Pediatrics] notes that reading to children is correlated with family income level — and, as the New YorkTimes reports, Scholastic is donating 500,000 books to the literacy advocacy group Reach Out and Read, which works with pediatricians to get books to low-income families — but even in families that make 400% of the poverty threshold only 60% of children are read to daily. – TIME

9.

Infants tune in to the rhythm and cadence of our voices, especially the familiar voices of their parents and caregivers. While initially the rhythmic phrase, “Brown bear, brown bear, what do you see?”, for example, may not hold meaning, your baby is taking in the sounds of language and how they fit together. As babies see a picture of a red bird in the book and you name the bird, they begin to make the connection between what you say and the picture of the red bird. The more you read that book, the stronger the connection. The repetitive storyline makes the book fun, engaging, and easier to remember. Reading to babies is not only a way to inspire a love of books from infancy, but also an important way to grow a baby’s vocabulary – first his understanding vocabulary and later her speaking vocabulary. – Bright Horizons

10.

Reading to babies can be a soothing, comforting activity but don’t be surprised if it takes a few sessions before you and your little one get into a rhythm with the right books and the right routine. By incorporating calm, unhurried reading into your little one’s nighttime routine, you’ll be helping to set the stage for a restful night’s sleep. – Early Moments age-

Originally Published 5/19/2016

One comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *